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Archive for August, 2013

St. Aidan of LindisfarneFeastday: August 31

Died: 651

Saint Aidan was born in Ireland. He studied under St. Senan before becoming a monk at Iona. At the request of King Oswald of Northumbria, Aidan went to Lindisfarne as bishop and was known throughout the kingdom for his knowledge of the Bible, his learning, his eloquent preaching, his holiness, his distaste for pomp, his kindness to the poor, and the miracles attributed to him.

He founded a monastery at Lindisfarne that became known as the English Iona and was a center of learning and missionary activity for all of northern England.

He died in 651 at the royal castle at Bamburgh.

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St. GenesiusFeastday: August 25

Patron of actors

Very little is known about Saint Genesius. Legend has it that during a stage performance before Emperor Diocletian in Rome, Saint Genesius, then a actor portrayed a catechumen about to be baptized in a play satirizing the Christian sacrament.

In the midst of the ceremony he was suddenly converted to Christianity. When presented to the Emperor, he declared his Christianity.

Enbraged, Diocletian had him turned over to Plautian, prefect of the praetorium, who tortured him in an effort to force him to sacrifice to the pagan gods. When Genesius persisted in his faith, he was beheaded.

Genesius is the patron of actors. His feast day is August 25.

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St. Ouen

St OuenFeastday: August 24

609 – 686

Saint Ouen is also known as Owen and Audoenus. He was the son of St. Authaire and was born at Sancy near Soissons, France. He was educated at St. Medard Abbey, served at the courts of King Clotaire II and his son Dagobert I, who made him his chancellor.

In 636, he built a monastery at Rebais. He was pursuaded not to become a monk there by Dagobert, and despite the fact that Ouen was a layman, he was active in promoting religion and combating simony. He was continued as chancellor by King Clovis II, was ordained and in 641, was consecrated archbishop of Rouen.

He encouraged learning and the founding of new monasteries. He was known for his personal austerities and charities, and supported missionary activities to pagan areas of his See. He supported Ebroin, mayor of the palace, against the nobles, and at the invitation of Thierry III, negotiated a peace between Neustria and Austrasia in Cologne.

He died at Clich near Paris on August 24 while returning from Cologne. His feast day is August 24.

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St. Hugh

St. Hugh

St. Hugh

Feastday: August 18

1246 – 1255

Saint Hugh is a nine year old martyr of Lincoln, England. He was a victim of ritual killing by English Jews. King Henry III conducted the investigation of the crime which resulted in eighteen or nineteen Jews being hanged.

Saint Hugh had been scourged, crowned with thorns, and crucified. Miracles supposedly accompanied the recovery of the lad’s body from a well and martyrdom became part of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

The feast of the saint is no longer kept by the Church, and the entire account of the young saint is considered an example of the anti Semitism which was rampant throughout the Middle Ages.

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St. Clare of MontefalcoFeastday: August 17

1268 – 1308

Saint Clare was born in Montefalco, Italy around 1268. As a young woman she joined a convent of Franciscan tertiaries. This group established Holy Cross Convent at Montefalco in 1290, adopting the Rule of St. Augustine.

Saint Clare’s sister Joan was the abbess of this community, but at her death Clare succeeded her. She led an austere life, being particularly devoted to the Passion of Christ and His Cross. When Clare died in 1308, an image of the Cross was found imprinted on her heart, and her body remained incorrupt.

She was canonized in 1881 by Pope Leo XIII. Her feast day is August 17th.

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St. ClareFeastday: August 11

Patron of sore eyes

Saint Clare was a beautiful Italian noblewoman who became the Foundress of an order of nuns now called “Poor Clares.” She was inspired by St. Francis of Assisi’s teachings and wanted to imitate him and live a poor humble life for Jesus. So one evening, she ran away from home, and in a little chapel outside Assisi, gave herself to God. St. Francis cut off her hair and gave her a rough brown habit to wear, tied with a plain cord around her waist. Her parents tried in every way to make her return home, but Clare would not.

Soon her sister, St. Agnes joined her, as well as other young women who wanted to be brides of Jesus, and live without any money. St. Clare and her sisters wore no shoes, ate no meat, lived in a poor house, and kept silent most of the time. Yet they were very happy, because Our Lord was close to them all the time.

Once, He saved them from a great danger in answer to St. Clare’s prayer. An army of rough soldiers came to attack Assisi and they planned to raid the convent first. Although very sick, St. Clare had herself carried to the wall and right there, where the enemies could see it, she had the Blessed Sacrament placed. Then on her knees, she begged God to save the Sisters.

St. Clare was sick and suffered great pains for many years, but she said that no pain could trouble her.
Her feast day is August 11.

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St LawrenceFeastday: August 10

Saint Lawrence was one of seven deacons who were in charge of giving help to the poor and the needy. When a persecution broke out, Pope St. Sixtus was condemned to death. As he was led to execution, Lawrence followed him weeping, “Father, where are you going without your deacon?” he said. “I am not leaving you, my son,” answered the Pope. “in three days you will follow me.” Full of joy, Lawrence gave to the poor the rest of the money he had on hand and even sold expensive vessels to have more to give away.

The Prefect of Rome, a greedy pagan, thought the Church had a great fortune hidden away. So he ordered Lawrence to bring the Church’s treasure to him. The Saint said he would, in three days. Then he went through the city and gathered together all the poor and sick people supported by the Church. When he showed them to the Prefect, he said: “This is the Church’s treasure!”

In great anger, the Prefect condemned Lawrence to a slow, cruel death. The Saint was tied on top of an iron grill over a slow fire that roasted his flesh little by little, but Lawrence was burning with so much love of God that he almost did not feel the flames. Then he prayed that the city of Rome might be converted to Jesus and that the Catholic Faith might spread all over the world. After that, he went to receive the martyr’s reward.
Saint Lawrence’s feast day is August 10th.

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