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Archive for July, 2013

St. Innocent IFrom catholic.org

Feastday: July 28

Saint Innocent was born at Albano, Italy. He became Pope, succeeding Pope St. Anastasius I, on December 22, 401. During Innocent’s pontificate, he emphasized papal supremacy, commending the bishops of Africa for referring the decrees of their councils at Carthage and Millevis in 416, condemning Pelagianism, to the Pope for confirmation.

It was his confirmation of these decrees that caused Augustine to make a remark that was to echo through the centuries: “Roma locuta, causa finitas” (Rome has spoken, the matter is ended).

Earlier Innocent had stressed to Bishop St. Victrius and the Spanish bishops that matters of great importance were to be referred to Rome for settlement. Innocent strongly favored clerical celibacy and fought the unjust removal of St. John Chrysostom. He vainly sought help from Emperor Honorius at Revenna when the Goths under Alaric captured and sacked Rome.

Innocent died in Rome on March 12. His feast day is July 28th.

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St NatalieFeastday: July 27

Died: 852

Not much is known about St. Natalie, except that she was martyred for her Faith with her husband Aurelius. According to his biography by St. Eulogius of Toledo, Aurelius was the son of a Muslim man and a Spanish Chirstian woman, and was orphaned as a child.

He was secretly raised a Christian by his aunt during the Moorish persecution of Christians. He married a half Moorish woman, Sabigotho, who took the name Natalie when he converted her to Christianity. They were both beheaded for practicing their religion openly together with George, a monk from Jerusalem whom Aurelius had befriended.

Their feast day is July 27th.

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St. Lawrence of BrindisiFrom catholic.org

Feastday: July 21
Patron of Brindisi
1559 – 1619

Caesare de Rossi was born at Brandisi, kingdom of Naples, on July 22nd. He was educated by the conventual Franciscans there and by his uncle at St. Mark’s in Venice. When sixteen, he joined the Capuchins at Verona, taking the name Lawrence.

He pursued his higher studies in theology, philosophy, the bible, Greek, Hebrew, and several other languages at the University of Padua. He was ordained and began to preach with great effect in Northern Italy.

He became definitor general of his Order in Rome in 1596, a position he was to hold five times, was assigned to conversion work with Jews, and was sent to Germany, with Blessed Benedict of Urbino, to combat Lutheranism.

They founded friaries at Prague, Vienna, and Gorizia, which were to develop into the provinces of Bohemia, Austria, and Styria.

At the request of Emperor Rudolf II, Lawrence helped raise an army among the German rulers to fight against the Turks, who were threatening to conquer all of Hungary, became its chaplain, and was among the leaders in the Battle of Szekesfehevar in 1601; many attributed the ensuing victory to him.

In 1602, he was elected Vicar General of the Capuchins but refused re-election in 1605. He was sent to Spain by the emperor to persuade Philip III to join the Catholic League, and while there, founded a Capuchin house in Madrid. He was then sent as papal nuncio to the court of Maximillian of Bavaria, served as peacemaker in several royal disputes, and in 1618, retired from worldly affairs to the friary at Caserta.

He was recalled at the request of the rulers of Naples to go to Spain to intercede with King Philip for them against the Duke of Osuna, Spanish envoy to naples and convinced the King to recall the Duke to avert an uprising.

The trip in the sweltering heat of summer exhausted him, and he died a few days after his meeting with the King at Lisbon on July 22nd. Lawrence wrote a commentary on Genesis and several treatises against Luther, but Lawrence’s main writings are in the nine volumes of his sermons.

He was canonized in 1881 and proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope John XXIII in 1959.
His feast day is July 21st.

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From catholic.org

St. Margaret of AntiochFeastday: July 20

Not much is known about Saint Margarent. Legend has ait that she was the daughter of a pagan priest at Antioch in Pisidia. She was converted to Christianity, whereupon she was driven from home by her father.

She became a shepherdess and when she spurned the advances of Olybrius, the prefect, who was infatuated with her beauty. He charged her with being a Christian. He had her tortured and then imprisoned. And while she was in prison she had an encounter with the devil in the form of a dragon.

According to the legend, he swallowed her, but the cross she carried in her hand so irritated his throat that he was forced to disgorge her. The next day, attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning, but she was miraculously saved and converted thousands of spectators witnessing her ordeal – all of whom were promptly executed.

Finally, she was beheaded. That she existed and was martyred are probably true; all else is probably fictitious.

She is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, and hers was one of the voices heard by Joan of Arc.
Her feast day is July 20th.

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St. Kateri TekakwithaFeastday: July 14

Patron of the environment and ecology
1656 – April 17, 1680

Saint Kateri was born near the town of Auriesville, New York, in the year 1656. She was the daughter of a Mohawk warrior. She was four years old when her mother died of smallpox. The disease also attacked Kateri and transfigured her face. She was adopted by her two aunts and an uncle.

Saint Kateri converted to Christian as a teenager. She was baptized at the age of twenty and incurred the great hostility of her tribe. Although she had to suffer greatly for her Faith, she remained firm in it.

She went to the new Christian colony of Indians in Canada. Here she lived a life dedicated to prayer, penitential practices, and care for the sick and aged. Every morning, even in bitterest winter, she stood before the chapel door until it opened at four and remained there until after the last Mass. She was devoted to the Eucharist and to Jesus Crucified.

She died on April 17, 1680 at the age of twenty-four. She is known as the “Lily of the Mohawks”. Devotion to Kateri is responsible for establishing Native American ministries in Catholic Churches all over the United States and Canada.

St. Kateri Teckakwitha is the first Native American to be declared a Saint. Her feastday is July 14. She is the patroness of the environment and ecology.

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From catholic.org

St. HenryFeastday: July 13

Patron of the childless, of Dukes, of the handicapped and those rejected by Religious Order
Died: 1024

St. Henry, son of Henry, Duke of Bavaria, and of Gisella, daughter of Conrad, King of Burgundy, was born in 972. He received an excellent education under the care of St. Wolfgang, Bishop of Ratisbon. I

n 995, St. Henry succeeded his father as Duke of Bavaria, and in 1002, upon the death of his cousin, Otho III, he was elected emperor. Firmly anchored upon the great eternal truths, which the practice of meditation kept alive in his heart, he was not elated by this dignity and sought in all things, the greater glory of God.

He was most watchful over the welfare of the Church and exerted his zeal for the maintenance of ecclesiastical discipline through the instrumentality of the Bishops. He gained several victories over his enemies, both at home and abroad, but he used these with great moderation and clemency.

In 1014, he went to Rome and received the imperial crown at the hands of Pope Benedict VIII. On that occasion he confirmed the donation, made by his predecessors to the Pope, of the sovereignty of Rome and the exarchate of Ravenna. Circumstances several times drove the holy Emperor into war, from which he always came forth victorious. He led an army to the south of Italy against the Saracens and their allies, the Greeks, and drove them from the country.

The humility and spirit of justice of the Saint were equal to his zeal for religion. He cast himself at the feet of Herebert, Bishop of Cologne, and begged his pardon for having treated him with coldness, on account of a misunderstanding. He wished to abdicate and retire into a monastery, but yielded to the advice of the Abbot of Verdun, and retained his dignity.

Both he and his wife, St. Cunegundes, lived in perpetual chastity, to which they had bound themselves by vow. The Saint made numerous pious foundations, gave liberally to pious institutions and built the Cathedral of Bamberg. His holy death occurred at the castle of Grone, near Halberstad, in 1024.

His feast day is July 13th. He is the patron saint of the childless, of Dukes, of the handicapped and those rejected by Religious Order.

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St. Astius

St. AstiusFeastday: July 7

Died: 117

Saint Astius was a martyr and bishop. According to legend he was the bishop of Dynhachium in Macedonia when he was seized and put to death by crucifixion by Roman authorities during the reign of Emperor Trajan.

A group of other martyrs, including Peregrinus, Gennanus, Lucian, Pompeius, hesychius, Papius and Saturninus were also slain because they expressed sympathy for Astius. They were supposedly wrapped in chains and hurled into the sea from the deck of a galley.

Their bodies were carried to shore by the waves, which were then hidden in the sand by Christians. The martyrs appeared to the Bishop of Alexandria ninety years later, ordering him to bury their bodies and to build a church over them.

Their feast day is 7 July.

St. Astius was declared patron protector of the city of Durrës.

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