Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for May, 2013

St. MarianaFeastday: May 26

Patron of Ecuador; Americas; bodily ills; loss of parents; people rejected by religious orders; sick people; sickness
1618 – 1645

Saint Mariana was born at Quito, Ecuador, of noble parents. She was orphaned as a child and was raised by her elder sister and her husband. Mariana was attracted to things religious and became a solitary in her sister’s home under the direction of Mariana’s Jesuit confessor. She practiced the greatest austerities, ate hardly anything, slept for only three hours a night for years, had the gift of prophesy, and reputedly performed miracles.

When an earthquake followed by an epidemic shook Quito in 1645, she offered herself publicly as a victim for the sins of the people. When the epidemic began to abate, she was stricken and died on May 26th.

She is known as Mariana of Quito and is often called “the lily of Quito.” She was canonized in 1950. Her feast day is May 26th.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

St. Urban

Feastday: May 25

Died: 230

St. Urban was a Pope and Martyr. He succeeded St. Calixtus in the year 223, the third of the emperor Alexander, and sat seven years.

Though the church enjoyed peace under that mild reign, this was frequently disturbed by local persecutions raised by the people or governors. In the acts of St. Cecily, this zealous pope is said to have encouraged the martyrs, and converted many idolaters. He is styled a martyr in the sacramentary of St. Gregory, in the Martyrology of St. Jerome published by Florentinius, and in the Greek liturgy.

It appears from Fortunatus, and several ancient missals, that the festival of St. Urban was celebrated in France with particular devotion in the sixth age. A very old church stood on the Appian road, dedicated to God in honor of this saint near the place where he was first interred in the cemetery of Praetextatus. His body was there found, together with those of SS. Cecily, Tiburtius, and Valerian, in 821, and translated by pope Paschal into the church of St Cecily.

Read Full Post »

St. DunstanFeastday: May 19

Patron of armorers, goldsmiths, locksmiths, and jewelers

Born to a noble family at Baltonsborough, near Glastonbury, England, Dunstan was educated there by Irish monks and while still a youth, was sent to the court of King Athelstan. He became a Benedictine monk about 934 and was ordained by his uncle, St. Alphege, Bishop of Winchester, about 939.

After a time as a hermit at Glastonbury, Dunstan was recalled to the royal court by King Edmund, who appointed him abbot of Glastonbury Abbey in 943. He developed the Abbey into a great center of learning while revitalizing other monasteries in the area. He also became the advisor to King Edred on his accession to the throne and began a far-reaching reform of all the monasteries in Edred’s realm.

Dunstan also became deeply involved in secular politics and incurred the enmity of the West Saxon nobles for denouncing their immorality and for urging peace with the Danes.

The king and archbishop then planned a thorough reform of Church and state. Dunstan was appointed legate by Pope John XII, and with St. Ethelwold and St. Oswald, restored ecclesiastical discipline, rebuilt many of the monasteries destroyed by the Danish invaders, replaced inept secular priests with monks, and enforced the widespread reforms they put into effect.

Dunstan served as Edgar’s chief advisor for sixteen years. When Edgar died, Dunstan helped elect Edward the martyr king and then his half brother Ethelred as the King. Under Ethelred, Dunstan’s influence began to wane and he retired from politics to Canterbury to teach at the Cathedral school and died there.

Dunstan has been called the reviver of monasticism in England. He was a noted musician, played the harp, composed several hymns, was a skilled metal worker, and illuminated manuscripts. He is the patron of armorers, goldsmiths, locksmiths, and jewelers. His feast day is May 19th.

Read Full Post »

St. Pope John IFeastday: May 18

Died: 526

St. John I (Pope and Martyr), was a native of Tuscany in Italy. He was elected Pope while he was still an archdeacon upon the death of Pope Hormisdas in 523. At that time, the ruler of Italy was Theodoric the Goth who subscribed to the Arian brand of Christianity, but had tolerated and even favored his Catholic subjects during the early part of his reign.

However, about the time of St. John’s accession to the Papacy, Theodoric’s policy underwent a drastic change as a result of two events: the treasonable correspondence between ranking members of the Roman Senate and Constantinople and the severe edict against heretics enacted by the emperor Justin I, who was the first Catholic on the Byzantine throne in fifty years.

Spurred on by the appeals of Eastern Arians, Theodoric threatened to wage war against Justin but ultimately decided to negotiate with him through a delegation of five Bishops and four senators. At its head he named Pope John – much against the latter’s wishes.

Pope John succeeded in persuading the Emperor to mitigate his treatment of the Arians and thus avoid reprisals against the Catholics in Italy. The Pope’s visit also brought about the reconciliation of the Western and Eastern Churches.

However, Theodoric had been becoming more suspicious with each passing day and as he got word of the friendly relations between the Pope and the emperor, he concluded that they were plotting against him. Hence, on the delegation’s return to the capitol city of Ravenna, Pope John was imprisoned by order of Theodoric and died a short time later as a result of the treatment he experienced there.

Read Full Post »

Pomarancio-St_Domitilla_with_Sts_Nereus_and_AchilleusFeastday: May 12

Not much is known about Saint Nereus and Saint Achilleus. Whatever little is known, comes from a testimony written by Pope St. Damasus in the fourth century and inscribed on a memorial tablet that commemorates their lives. But even this commentary comes 300 years after they died.

Damasus tells us that Nereus and Achilleus were soldiers in the Roman army where they helped carry out the persecution of Christians. They probably had nothing against Christians and didn’t carry for the bloody slaughter they were commanded to perform, but they obeyed these cruel orders out of fear of dying themselves. After all, that was what soldiers have always been expected to do.

We are not told how they were converted, only that it was a “miracle of faith.” After this miracle, they threw down their weapons and escaped from their camp, discarding armor and arms as they went toward their new life in Christ. As participants in the persecution they knew perhaps better than any other Christian what pain awaited them. Faith, however, had triumphed over fear of death and the victory of faith was the sweetest they had known.

We are told they were martyred but Damasus doesn’t mention how.

Later legend had it that they served Flavia Domitilla, the great-niece of Emperor Domitian, and were exiled and executed with her when she converted. This legend probably originated in the fact that the martyrs were buried in what was later known as the cemetery of Domitilla.

Read Full Post »

<<Taken from catholic.org>>

St. Anastasius VIIFeastday: May 11
Died: 251

Saint Anastasius was a martyr and convert to Christ. He was a tribune in the Roman army in the reign of Decius. Forced to torture Christians as part of the imperial persecution of the faithful, Anastasius was impressed by their courage and loyalty. He became a convert, and when his Christian faith was discovered he and his family, as well as all of his servants, were beheaded.

Read Full Post »

St. Hilary of ArlesFrom catholic.org

Feastday: May 5
400 – 449

Saint Hilary was the Bishop of Arles, France, and friend and relative of St. Honoratus. He was born to a noble family in Lorraine and was successful, although he gave up his secular career to join St. Honoratus at Lerins Abbey.

When Honoratus died after being named the bishop of Arles, Hilary was chosen as his successor in 429. He was known for his austerities, his aid to the poor, and for ransoming captives. On two occasions Hilary became embroiled in controversies with Pope St. Leo I the Great, but they were reconciled, and Hilary’s sanctity brought him great veneration.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »